Beaded Color Wheel

As an avid bead and button collector, I’m always looking for fun ways to use the supplies that I have. And maybe, just maybe, I’m always looking for an excuse to add to my collections!

I recently stitched one of my patterns, the Fractured Color Wheel, entirely in buttons.

This project took a little over two weeks and I worked on it almost exclusively during that time, but I didn’t track how many hours that I spent on it. A project like this is thought-consuming to me and so the time doesn’t even matter…I can hardly wait to return to it while I’m working on other things!

It is heavy…perhaps one of the heaviest hoops that I have ever stitched! In fact, I had to take it to the grocery store to weigh it on the produce scale and it came in at a whopping 1 lb, 8oz. That might not sound super heavy, but comparing it to most of my hoops (which probably don’t even reach 1 lb), it’s h e a v y!

Here’s the non-beaded, fabric-only version:


To convert this color wheel to an all-beaded wheel rather than a fabric one is very simple!

Choose a background fabric that is simple and light (it makes it easier to trace your pattern onto a light color). Your fabric will be so loaded up with beads and buttons and sequins by the end, that you won’t see it, so don’t use your favorite piece on this project!

Choose the color wheel size that you want to work with (the pattern offers three sizes). I chose to fit my color wheel into a 12-inch hoop.

Print out the pattern and place your fabric on it (pattern facing up, front side of the fabric facing up).

Using a light source (window or Lightbox) and a water soluble pen, trace the pattern onto the fabric. Again, your marks will not need to be washed off because they will be completely covered.

Once the pattern has been traced, fit the fabric into an embroidery hoop and tighten your fabric. And then let the fun begin!

With my fabric pen, I wrote the colors that I wanted to be in each portion of the color wheel. I then began with the biggest pieces…the buttons.

It helped to choose the buttons for each color and then stitch them in place before beginning with the beads. This helps you to visually focus on what color is placed in what spot, but it also helps to have the largest pieces in place first.

Once I had the large buttons in place, I began adding beads and sequins. Large beads first and the smallest beads last (the smallest beads help to fill in any areas that have white peeking through.

Continue adding your embellishments until you can’t see white through the hoop anymore. Tighten your fabric in the hoop once again and then follow the directions in the pattern for finishing the hoop. And you’re done!


One note about thread: I used <a href=”http://Sulky 12 Wt. Cotton Petites Thread” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>Sulky 12 wt Petites which is my favorite beading thread. I did not want to use a stranded thread because it’s a little tricky when you are working with lots of beads and I didn’t want to deal with tangles. Having a spool is really helpful. It’s also strong enough to handle all of this beading!

One other note: if you are stitching on heavy beads, it is helpful to stitch through the bead several times. The same thing goes for buttons. You are going to be spending lots of time on this, make sure your beads and buttons are on the fabric nice and tight so that if an accident happens, your beads don’t go scattering everywhere! And hopefully an accident doesn’t happen!

The embroidery stand that I used is also really helpful with a heavy embroidery project. You can find it here. I like that this stand is adjustable into several positions and it never feels like it’s going to be top-heavy when a project is secured into it.


And that’s it! With this post, I’m sending along to you the confidence to take on a project like this…it really is a beginner-friendly project! And it spotlights all of those special embellishments that you’ve been hoarding…I mean, collecting!!!

Have fun stitching and beading and be sure to tag me on Instagram if you take on this project!


Note: some links in this post are affiliate links. I will never recommend something to you that I have never personally tried and that I don’t stand behind for the use intended! 

Bluprint + Embroidery

If you’ve been wanting to take my Bluprint embroidery class, but haven’t yet, now is the time to check it out! All classes on Bluprint are under $20 right now but this special sale is only good through the 27th, so now is your chance!!


And speaking of Bluprint and embroidery, you may have seen my unboxing last week on Instagram of one of the brand new Craft Subscription boxes. In the box, I received the Sage Florals embroidery pattern with everything that I need to get started right away.

I promised some tips on transferring an embroidery pattern, especially when transferring onto a darker fabric. I received a DMC Embroidery Pencil in white and that is the perfect pencil for transferring patterns. I like that you don’t need to press hard to make marks on your fabric.

So before you begin to transfer a pattern, I find it helpful to iron the fabric first. You want a smooth surface to transfer onto. After ironing, you’ll need your pattern and a light source. Sometimes my light source will be a window and sometimes it is my Lightbox. For this pattern, I chose the Lightbox.

Here’s a super fast video of my transfer process. You’ll notice that I turn the Lightbox off and on several times because that is the only way to check that I am transferring all of the lines. Also, I’m not super exact with my transferring. Because I know that I’m probably going to play with the pattern, I’m not very worried that everything is transferred exactly. However, if you are not a rule breaker (like me!!), then you’ll want to take your time and be more precise that I am!

Now, I’m off to finish up several more projects and then I’m going to embroider this project!

Stay tuned for the reveal of a beaded project that I just finished stitching and am absolutely in love with!

Now is the time to Boho your Embroidery!

20181207_11736_boho-style-mixed-media-embroidery_nicole-vogelsinger_1046

If you’ve been wanting to try my Bluprint class Boho Style: Mixed-Media Embroidery but haven’t yet, now is the time! Through Sunday, July 21, you can watch not only my class, but all of the other classes that Bluprint has to offer, for FREE!

20181207_11736_boho-style-mixed-media-embroidery_nicole-vogelsinger_1069

That’s right! Try your hand at Mixed-Media Embroidery and see how much fun it can be to add texture and embellishments to your embroidery!

titlecard_11736

I highly recommend my own class (!) but here are a few more of my favorites:

Natalie Chanin’s “The New Embroidery: Simple Geometry, Beautiful Stitches”

Jessica Long’s “3D Embroidery: The Modern Cameo”

Brooke Lark’s “Flay Lay Your Life: Pro Photo Tips”

Have fun watching and learning and don’t forget to tag me in any photos you share on Instagram!

 

All Things Embroidery

So many of you have reached out to me with questions on various embroidery and beading tools and so, to help you out, I’ve been tweaking my Amazon storefront and have broken all of my suggestions into lists: Books for Inspiration, Boho Embroidery Essentials and Boho Beading Essentials.

Everything that I have included in my lists, are things that I personally have used (or read!) over and over and over again and I can without a doubt recommend these items to you! If you ever have suggestions for me to try out, or questions, don’t hesitate to ask! For now hopefully these lists will help you as you build up your Boho Embroidery toolkit!

 

 

wildboho on amazon

I was recently invited to be a part of Amazon’s influencer program. What that basically means is that I am able to curate a landing page on amazon filled with all of my favorite stitching-related items! I’ve added several of my must-haves and will update the items there when I find new items that I love! You will only ever see items there that I have tried and tested and truly love working with, from books to gadgets to things that make your embroidery more enjoyable!

You can check out my page HERE.

Happy stitching!

Cricut + Simplicity + wildboho

I wish I could tell you that I love sewing something from a pattern, but in the interest of full disclosure, I’m going to tell you that it is one of my least favorite things to do!

What I do like to do, is stray outside of the lines and not have to worry about staying within the confines of a pattern!

So….when I was given the opportunity to work with one of Simplicity’s new patterns for the Cricut Maker, I hesitated and had to work myself up to giving this a try. I already knew that the machine would do much of the work…cutting the pieces, etc, but I wasn’t sure I was up for the challenge of following a pattern!

Because I have a soft spot for flowers, this Flower and Arrangement pattern caught my eye and I thought it might make a unique embellishment for a piece of hoop art. So, with reluctance (!),  I accepted the challenge.

Screen Shot 2018-05-23 at 11.36.27 AM

I’m going to walk you through this pattern, step by step, and I’ll give you a little hint about the process…it wasn’t as scary as I thought it was going to be!

Alright, let’s start this pattern!

Step One: gather your Cricut materials and the Simplicity PDF pattern.

img_7863

You will need the fabric mat, the rotary blade for cutting fabric and the washable fabric pen for marking the pattern pieces.

Step Two: gather your fabrics.

The pattern shows you the pieces that make up the flower. You can base your color choices off of that like I did my second time through.

I’ll be honest and tell you that I forgot to print the pattern directions first and so I just randomly picked colors from my pile of fabrics when it told me to insert a new mat!

It all turned out very pretty in the end but I would not recommend that you use my method!!

So, you’ve read through the pattern (well done, you!) and you’ve chosen your fabrics. It’s time to move on to Step Three: Let the machine do the work for you!

The screen shot shows you what you will see in Design Space. From this point on, you will just be putting the correct fabrics on the mats and the machine will do everything else!

Screen Shot 2018-05-23 at 11.36.57 AM

The rotary blade and washable pen are in position and my fabric is ready to be cut!

Check this out: do you see all of those perfect little points that have been cut out? Yup, the machine did that, not me!

Step Four: continue letting the machine do the work! How easy is that?!

You will soon end up with a tidy little pile of cut pieces, just like what you see below!

One suggestion after working through this pattern a few times: when you get to the two round circle pieces, choose a heavier fabric. My first choice was a thinner batik piece of fabric. My second choice was a heavier piece of textured cotton fabric. Finally on my third time cutting the pieces for the pattern, I decided to use a scrap of  wool felt and that was definitely the best choice. The other fabric pieces worked fine, but because this is the piece that you are hand sewing everything on to, you want something fairly sturdy.

I should also warn you that Step Five involves me breaking from the pattern in one other way: I did not use my sewing machine! Nope, not once.

If you follow along with my stitching adventures, you’ll already know that I prefer hand stitching to machine sewing. I wanted to try this entire pattern without the machine, just so that I could tell you that it was possible! And it is!

Your pieces have all been cut and you are ready to turn them into flowers!

This was the only step that slightly confused me and so I wanted to show several pictures to help you out.

You will fold the sides of your rectangular piece in towards the center.

Next you will fold that piece in half.

Grab a needle and some thread (I prefer the Sulky 12wt petites for this step) and stitch a running stitch along the bottom.

Tie a knot and then pull your thread right so that the fabric gathers up nice and makes a little ruffle.

The blue marks and the pattern will show you where each piece is to be stitched on to the circle.

Continue with each piece of fabric, following the directions as to where to attach it to the disc.

Because I (unfortunately) only have two hands, I couldn’t take pictures of how I actually wrapped the rose. That step is mostly self-explanatory and if I was able to figure it out, then you will just fine!

Soon you will have a complete flower!

So, what to do with your flower at this point?

Well, you can leave it completely as is and be done! Stitch a pin back or hair clip onto it and wear it as an accessory!

Or, and you should also know that this is always my go-to option, you can put it in a hoop!

Here is my simple version of the flower and arrangement attached to a fabric that has been stretched in a hoop.

Simple and pretty!

But, why stop there? You could take it one step further and add other embellishments, like the pattern suggests.

Here is my gussied up version! I added wispy bits of lace, gears and buttons.

And because I love to show you options, (and can’t resist Boho-ing up a project!) here is what you can create if you cut a few extra pieces and arrange them to your liking!

Each piece in the above hoop has been cut by my Cricut Maker according to the pattern. I just rearranged pieces and added some embroidery!

And speaking of embroidery, do you see those words?

My absolute favorite feature of using Design Space and my Cricut Maker is that I can create text and have it written directly into fabric with the washable pen!

So many fonts! So much versatility! I cannot gush enough about this function!

Since unboxing my Maker, I have used this function more than anything else. There’s not stopping me…I can add words to anything!

And there you have it..my first Simplicity pattern and I survived and actually went on to make it several times and enjoyed the process!

Now I can breathe a sigh of relief and pass some confidence on to you. Now, go….create something!


Fabrics provided by:

Flaurie and Finch (Blossom Batiks)

Andover Fabrics (Alison Glass Mariner Cloth and Golden Hour)

Threads I used:

Sulky 12 Wt Petites

Sue Spargo Eleganza


 

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

Adventures in Cricut-ing

This week I’ve been procrastinating on a bigger project by working on several smaller, not-super-important-to-get-finished-right-away projects!!!

There are lots of features that I haven’t touched yet with my Cricut Maker and so this was the week to try two of them: writing with a washable fabric marker and using the bonded fabric blade to cut Heat n Bond-ed fabric.

Both were a success!

First of all, the washable fabric pen. I wanted to have several lines of text printed on fabric that I will then embroider. In Design Space, I was able to customize the text (by the way, the new feature to curve text is amazing!)

If you look super closely, you’ll see that I lost an i because I didn’t realize it wasn’t attached when I hit Go! That is easily fixable and will remind me next time to check what is printing before I actually print it!

I was also worried that the fabric pen would somehow bleed on the fabric and my words wouldn’t be clear, but that didn’t happen and they are crisp and clear and ready to stitch!

Here’s my Instagram story showing my first try!

 

So then on to the bonded fabric blade. I wanted to cut several flowers for this collage hoop:

Normally, I sketch out what I want to cut on Heat n Bond and then iron it to the fabric and cut from there. So this time I wanted to see if it would be any quicker to set-up a bunch of flower shapes in Design Space and then cut them all at once.

Using the bonded fabric blade, I ironed the Heat n Bond to the fabric and then placed the fabric face down (heat n bond side up) and cut my flowers.

I even timed my efforts to see how quickly these would cut! (1 minute and 7 seconds, in case you were wondering!!)

So there you have it! Now I should probably stop procrastinating and get on with my other projects!


This post does contain affiliate links. It also contains lots of opinions, all of which are mine!